The insider secrets that can lower the value of your home

In this blog, we’re going to look at the more unusual factors that influence the saleability of your house, and what you can do to ensure you get the best price possible.

If you’re looking to sell your house fast, it can be surprising how even the smallest things affect the value of your home, and consequently, the likelihood of a prospective buyer making a reasonable offer.

Personal taste

If you live on a street of identical houses, you may feel a bit disconcerted by the range of sold property prices – even if they all have the same floorplan. However, if you take a closer look at the available photographs, the difference in value can easily be explained by the owner’s personal taste.

When you are presenting your home, it’s important to decorate it in a way that allows a prospective buyer to visualise themselves living there. This is often achieved by using basic colours such as cream or lavender wall paint and carpets – acting as a blank canvas for the buyer’s imagination. If you choose to incorporate odd decorative elements into your home, it may appear charming to yourself, but there is always a strong chance that it will deter previously interested parties.

Be nice to your neighbours

We all know that the personality of our neighbours is outside of our control, but for the sake of keeping your property value high it is always worth, when possible, to treat them with respect. There is always a chance that both your estate agents and prospective buyers will choose to talk with your neighbours to learn more about what it is like to live there – and a disgruntled neighbour can easily discourage a potential buyer and force you to lower your asking price.

It’s good to be odd

As strange as it sounds, the value of a home can be affected by the number on the door. Research by Zoopla found that odd-numbered houses can reach, on average, £538 more than their even-numbered counterparts.

While there is very little you can do with the designated number of your house, you can always choose to name it, and register that name with the Land Registry. Of course, the number will still remain in the address, but a pleasant title for the property can often encourage buyers to ignore the numerical curse.

Go for natural privacy

If you’re lucky enough to have a front garden, or a rear garden that is overlooked by other homes, you may want to invest in some trees. Much research has been conducted into the effect of trees and hedges on a street, and property values can be as much as five per cent lower if there aren’t any. The benefits of trees and hedges are obvious – the contrasting colours, the improved air quality and noise reduction from roads – but it is the privacy those plants provide that entices buyers and increases property values. After all, it’s always nice to be able to sunbathe privately in your own garden during the few warm days we get per year.

Campaign for development

While many people would prefer companies not to build supermarkets, stadiums, and golf courses near their homes – they may change their tune if they knew the mere presence of those developments can send your home’s value shooting through the roof. Having a supermarket nearby can raise the value of a property by as much as a whopping £40,000 (depending on the quality of the brand), and having a golf course within a reasonable distance of your domicile can increase the value of your home by a shocking 56 per cent. So if large companies begin to question residents regarding their support for large developments such as these, it may be worth letting those who live nearby know about the benefits.

Unfortunately, there are always some homes that are impossible to sell in a short time-frame. This can be because of structural issues, bad neighbours, or simply due to a lack of local amenities. Luckily, National Homebuyers are always willing to buy any home, regardless of condition or location, and are constantly inundated by clients who need to sell their homes fast for the sake of a new job, or simply to be closer to family.

Looking for a quick sale? Why not ask National Homebuyers for advice, as we buy any house. Call 08000 443 911 or request a call back to find out how much you could get for your property.

How to sell a house fast

Selling a house is an experience that many homeowners consider a necessary evil if they wish to upsize or downsize. Whether the stress comes from trying to find a decent agent, staying optimistic about viewings, or simply waiting for a buyer to make an offer – the house selling process is not one for the faint of heart. And when there is a limited time frame within which a sale must be made, anxiety levels can often shoot through the roof. However, the ability to sell a house fast is an important skill to learn for those hoping to move house for a new job, or simply to be closer to loved ones.

How to sell a house fast in a slow market

There are often times throughout the year where the property market appears to be in the midst of a massive slowdown. As a result, many vendors around the country find themselves reducing their house prices in order to remain competitive – but are they panicking unnecessarily?

In short, the answer is yes. Similar to stock markets, the world of property is heavily underpinned by consumer confidence, so even in the quietest months it doesn’t take much for the market to gain enough inertia for activity to increase rapidly. One of the best ways to ensure that you can sell a house fast in a slow market is to increase the visibility of your home to potential buyers – this means ensuring that you do not enter an agreement for any single agent to be the sole contract holder for the sale. Admittedly, you may end up paying a slightly higher commission by using multiple agents, but if you need to sell your house quickly, it is often necessary to make concessions.

Another great tip to drum-up a bit of interest in your home is to take advantage of mediums such as social media – after all, you never know whether a friend, or a friend of a friend maybe on the lookout for a new home. Plus, if you sell the home yourself, you can always pocket the commission that you would normally pay to an agent.

Sometimes, however, you need to sell your house fast, and no matter what you try, the market continues to be stagnant. In these circumstances, you can try using house buying companies who will buy any home, regardless of market conditions or location to help you move on with your life.

Tips on how to sell your house quickly

Even if the market is in full swing, selling a house quickly can still be a very stressful experience. Luckily, there are a few things you can do to increase the likelihood of a quick sale:

  • Find an agent who has experience in both your area, and also your style of home. When it comes to selling a house, experience matters.
  • Make yourself available as often as possible for any potential viewings. While this is easier said than done, the more time you can make for those looking at purchasing, the faster a sale can be achieved.
  • Offer your agent an incentive in regard to commission levels. Be clear that if a sale can be achieved in a specified time frame, the greater their earnings will be.
  • Try researching some sold property prices in your area to ensure that you aren’t asking too much, and if it is within your budget, maybe undercut the competition.
  • If you have the time, try making a list of all local amenities and their respective distances from your home. Many sellers will judge certain areas harshly without ever visiting them, so give them a great reason to consider yours.
  • Get in touch with your conveyancer early. Quite often, the greatest delays do not come from a lack of potential buyers, but from the movement of paperwork between the relevant parties.
  • If you have a choice, avoid buyers who are stuck in a chain and go for those who are able to move in straight away. And if they’re cash buyers, even better.

Choose the best time to sell your home

While there are always a large number of househunters on the prowl at any given time throughout the year, there is a marked difference in market activity between the seasons.

Traditionally the worst times to sell are always during summer and winter. A large number of potential homeowners will have children of varying ages – and as many parents can attest, the summer and winter holidays are often stressful enough without having to factor in the purchase of a new home. Moreover, during the summer months when the weather is nice, people try to avoid stress by going on holiday – a lofty expense in itself; while around the Christmas period, the cost of travelling and presents can often leave your bank account drained.

If you can afford to wait, experts will always advise a vendor to place their home on the market in either spring or autumn.

In spring, the longer days not only encourage buyers to look around for a new home, but the additional light also helps to make a house seem more aesthetically pleasing and bright than in winter. Additionally, if you have a garden, the warmer temperatures and sunshine will help your flowers bloom – a welcome sight for any potential purchaser.

In autumn, buyers with children will have a bit more time on their hands once all the schools are open again. Furthermore, those who missed the spring bubble will be keen to buy and settle in before the temperatures begin to plunge again.

Prepare your house for a quick sale

Despite all the effort you put into making your home visible to potential buyers, if it doesn’t look desirable, the chances of achieving a sale in a short time frame are very slim. So why not do everything you can to make your home as attractive as possible? It may seem obvious, but a large number of houses don’t sell simply because the owners haven’t bothered to make it look appealing to a potential buyer.

  • Go minimal – buyers are always more enthusiastic about a property if they can see themselves living there. This means removing a large amount of your personality from the décor, and replacing it with a clear, canvas upon which they can project theirs – so try neutral colours on your walls and floors.
  • Keep all laundry and clutter out of the way, and ensure that all doorways are clear from obstructions.
  • Consider re-varnishing and treating any external wooden areas such as sills, doors, and cladding to prevent your home from looking ‘old’.
  • Keep it perpetually clean – it may be tough, but you don’t want to have to turn-away viewings because you had a week where you let your house turn into a bombsite.
  • If you’re selling during the winter months, make sure you keep the heating on throughout the day – even if you’ve already moved out.
  • Keep the windows open prior to a visit, and invest in some air fresheners or odour absorbers to place around the home to remove any unwanted smells.
  • If you have kids, make sure that their toys are confined to their room during viewings – while they may be adorable, certain buyers may not find their presence as welcoming as you had hoped.
  • Keep your curtains open – a house will always look more inviting when viewed with copious amounts of natural light.

Ultimately, learning how to sell a house fast isn’t easy – but it’s always worth doing everything within your power to encourage your home to stand out from the crowd, and remind yourself that upon completing the sale, it will have all been worth it.

Looking for a fast house sale? Why not ask National Homebuyers for advice, as we buy any house. Call 08000 443 911 or request a call back to find out how much you could get for your property.

Can you sell a house with asbestos in the UK?

Across the country, there are a number of older properties that still contain the toxic material, and its presence can often deter potential buyers for good reason. So how do you sell a house that contains asbestos?

Asbestos is a silicate mineral has been mined for over four thousand years around the world. With a wide range of uses, it was often hailed as a ‘wonder material’ by many prominent historical figures throughout the Roman Empire and Persia.

Why is asbestos dangerous and is it illegal to sell a house with asbestos?

Categorised into six separate classifications, it’s easy to see why asbestos was heavily used in UK property construction during the 20th century – it was resistant to fire, did not conduct electricity, and was an excellent heat insulator – but most importantly, it was mined locally and therefore extremely cost effective.

While the different available forms of asbestos vary in their potential to harm those who come into contact with it, they are all linked to a condition known as asbestosis. During its manufacturing process and implementation in many types of construction, the dust that was produced contained sharp asbestos particles that often found their way into the lungs of workers, cutting and scarring the delicate tissue inside and frequently causing tuberculosis and fibrosis. In the US alone, the handling of asbestos has led to the deaths of approximately 100,000 people since records began.

In the modern era, large-scale mining in the UK started in the late 19th century, but despite the first asbestos-related death occurring in 1906, it took until 1985 for the first partial ban to be passed through parliament.

While it isn’t illegal to sell a house with asbestos, for homeowners in the process of selling a house containing the material, the number of steps required to find a buyer can be a nightmare. But what measures need to be undertaken in order to sell a house fast?

Asbestos disclosure when selling a house in the UK

Since the repeal of the Property Misdescriptions Act in 2013, all sellers are obliged to disclose the presence of asbestos during a sale. Of course, owners are not expected to detect the presence of asbestos in their home by themselves, but more than likely this information will have been uncovered by a chartered surveyor before they moved in.

In a large majority of cases, a seller will also be using a surveyor to determine the value of their home prior to placing it on the market, and their estate agent of choice will likely query the presence of asbestos based on the age and construction type of the property. Generally, any home built before 1978 could contain the toxic material, and a failure to detect the presence of asbestos in these instances could open up both the surveyor and agent to prosecution.

However, in many cases a surveyor would only be liable if asbestos was detectable by reasonable means – i.e. a surveyor cannot be expected to detect its presence through a solid wall or other unreachable areas.

How can I sell a house with asbestos?

If a surveyor’s valuation or agent’s report have determined that there is asbestos in your house, then further inspection is needed by a qualified professional who will be able to establish whether or not it could endanger the lives of those living within the property. It is important to note that asbestos does not pose a threat if it is in good condition – it is only when the material has been damaged or disturbed that its removal may be warranted.

If the material is in good condition then the law merely requires the seller to disclose the information to potential buyers and it is up to the latter to decide whether or not it is worth pursuing a purchase. If the asbestos, however, is found to pose a hazard to health then the situation can become a little more complicated.

Asbestos removal can be expensive, with average prices reaching £75 + VAT per sq. m – so even a small 6m x 5m ceiling can reach £2200 + VAT. For a seller, it comes down to a choice between having the material removed themselves at great cost, or placing the house on the market at a reduced rate to encourage a sale – although the number of potential buyers is likely to be limited due to health concerns.

House buying companies, however, are always happy to offer competitive prices to owners regardless of the presence of asbestos. Those looking to move house in a short time-frame often find this to be a preferable method, with sales completed in as little as two weeks.

Finding it hard to sell? Why not ask National Homebuyers for advice, as we buy any house. Call 08000 443 911 or request a call back to find out how much you could get for your property.

Selling a hoarder’s home

While many people enjoy tuning into reality television shows that expose the nightmarish conditions within which many hoarders live, the reality behind the ratings push is often much more morbid.

Many of us know, or have known an individual who lives in a hoarder house, and are more than aware that the problem has its roots in mental illness. For older people who lived through the Second World War, the lack of available provisions and luxury items at the time led to a shift in mentality where the idea of discarding unwanted or unnecessary items could come back to haunt them if they ever faced the same situation. For others, it is an offshoot of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and depression – believing that an item they no longer need could be either useful in the future, or has a sentimental value that elevates its status above that of a simple ‘object’.

As hoarding itself is surprising prevalent across the country – albeit at different levels of severity – it often affects not just the hoarder, but their friends and family also. Moreover, hoarders themselves are more likely to suffer from depression, social anxiety, and various other disorders that heavily impact their mental and physical health. And sadly, as a result of these ailments they are far more likely to die earlier, leaving their nearest and dearest with the unpleasant task of selling a loved one’s hoarder home.

On the other hand, a hoarder may simply be trying to move so that they can fight the illness and make a fresh start, and in these situations, they are hoping to sell their house fast before they have a change of heart.

Obviously, a hoarder home is often unsellable as it stands, and so a number of steps must be taken to make the property seem appealing to those who are in the market to buy. But how do you go about selling a hoarder’s house?

Cleaning a hoarder’s house

An important realisation to make early on in the process is to be aware that you need more than one person to see the task through to completion. Not only is it dangerous to clean a hoarder home by yourself in case of an accident, but also because of the sheer scale of the task. While there are many companies who are happy to be sub-contracted to carry out the cleaning, they are unlikely to have known the hoarder on a personal level, and as a result they may find it hard to differentiate between the accumulated items that bare no value, and those items that are genuinely important or carry a true sentimental value to the ex-resident. By overseeing the project, you can ensure that important memories are kept safe by employing people you trust to help.

In order to put a hoarder house up for sale, it must first be habitable and safe. So, if you find yourself tasked with a hoarding clean up, there are some important rules to be followed.

1) Make the necessary safety arrangements

Due to the sheer number of objects, a hoarder house will have been hard to keep clean. It is, therefore, of paramount importance to wear the right protective clothing in case you run into any issues that could directly affect your health.

  • Ensure that you have face masks to protect your team from dust, fibreglass insulation, rotten food, or dead rodents.
  • Wear industrial-grade protective gloves to prevent cuts, or from having your skin exposed to dangerous materials.
  • Wear appropriate waterproof overalls to prevent you from carrying any hazardous substances away from the house in the fibres of your clothing.
  • Have a first-aid kit on site, as well as someone who is trained as a first-responder.

2) Hire skips for disposal

It is surprising just how many items can fit inside a home. In many cases, a small two-bedroom house can hold up to several skips worth of refuse, so be sure not to underestimate the situation.

3) Gather your cleaning supplies

Some of the key supplies needed throughout the clean-up will include: heavy-duty leak-proof refuse sacks; receptacles for items you aim to keep; both light and heavy-duty cleaning agents; disposable sponges, mops and cloths; a vacuum cleaner; and commercial carpet-cleaning equipment.

4) Empty the house

For anyone looking at buying a hoarder house, it’s much easier to see the property’s potential if they can see the layout in all its glory – so get your team to start with a single room, separating out items that need to be kept from those that can be disposed of, and start filling the skips. Once the first room is complete, move onto the next.

5) Start cleaning

Using the cleaning supplies, start sponging down walls, windows and windowsills before utilising industrial strength cleaners in rooms such as bathrooms and kitchens to remove any residual bacteria. There are likely to be many things in the house that are unsalvageable such as soiled carpets and curtains, as well as dis-coloured and damaged wallpaper – so prepare yourself for several days of elbow-grease.

It is also important to find the source of any unpleasant smells – if a hoarder has had pets, you may find that certain floorboards are soaked with urine, and they will need to be replaced.

6) Start restoring

Once cleaned, your can start making the home look habitable again. Go for neutral-colours when painting the walls and ceilings, and ensure that any out-dated equipment such as old ovens and microwaves are removed and replaced. It’s also a good idea to check the heating systems, as boilers in a hoarder’s house are unlikely to have been serviced in recent years.

Selling a hoarder’s house

Once you are ready to sell, the majority of the hard work will be behind you. Look for a local agent with prior experience with hoarder homes, but ideally, hire the photographer yourself. A true professional will always know the right angles from which to snap a shot, and through the use of a wide-angle lens make the home itself seem much more spacious.

For those who would prefer to avoid the traditional route of selling a house, you can also try hosting open days where in a preferred time slot, anyone who wants to look inside can come and show their interest.

Alternatively, you can contact National Homebuyers who will offer you a competitive price for the home, with the benefit of a fast sale within two weeks regardless of situation or location. And remember, if you would rather avoid the task of cleaning the house yourself, house buying companies will gladly offer to do the hard work for you once it is purchased.

Are you desperate to sell a hoarder home? Why not ask National Homebuyers for advice, as we buy any house. Call 08000 443 911 or request a call back to find out how much you could get for your property.

How to sell a house that needs work done

For those who need to sell their house fast but don’t have the time to renovate, finding a buyer willing to pay a decent sum is hard work – so how do you maximise your profit?

Many individuals purchase a home with the hopes that, over time, they can renovate it. However, by the time they need to sell, they find that they have either never had the time to commit to making the necessary repairs, or simply lacked the motivation to do so.

The house, if sold, may provide a better return than the price it was purchased for, but the likelihood is that it will fall well-short of the asking price the vendors were hoping for.

Luckily, if you are selling a house that needs repairs, there are steps that you can take to ensure you attract the right kind of buyer who sees the potential in your home, despite the obvious drawbacks.

So, what are the important repairs to make when selling a house?


Deciding which features are worth spending money on is always a bit of a gamble, but the best way to get the most out of your sale is by putting yourself in the shoes of a potential buyer, and identify issues from the outside-in.

If you were to look upon your home for the first time, what would be immediately obvious? For many houses, the front elevation can be easily improved by re-varnishing wooden window and door frames – as well as ensuring that the windows themselves are kept clean. It’s also worth looking at the possibility of purchasing a new front door if your present one is beginning to look a bit shabby.

For many city houses, a build-up of carbon from road traffic can also make a home look tired and undesirable. So why not hire a pressure washer to dispel the decades of unsightly pollution and make your external walls look brand new?

Other peripheral features that are easy to tidy up include gardens and yards. By using weed-killer on paths and flower beds as well as re-gravelling your driveway and re-seeding your lawn, you can easily show that the house itself is well cared for, providing a great reason for buyers to enquire further.

Inside the home, there may of course, be a number of obvious issues that need attention such as damage to walls and doors – much of which can be taken care of with a liberal application of filler – but what about the less obvious details?

Many sellers choose to replace flooring in preparation for a sale, but it is worth noting that the majority of buyers will be replacing the floor themselves at some point, no matter how pleased you are with the present style. So why not save yourself money and time and hire a carpet cleaning machine which can easily remove years of dirt and discolouration.

So, what else should you consider when selling a house that needs repair? Regardless of your preference for colour and style, remember that you need a buyer to see the potential in your home, so make sure that all walls are painted in neutral colours such as cream, white, or lavender. While a paint job may take up a few weekends, the increased saleability of the property will make it all worthwhile by the time you finalise a deal.

What about a house that needs major repairs?

The roof may be starting to sag – but is it leaking? The foundations are not in the best condition – but do they pose a threat to the house in terms of stability? For serious issues, there is little point trying to pretend they don’t exist.

Any self-respecting buyer or developer will undoubtedly employ a structural surveyor prior to purchase, and if these structural problems end up being exposed in a Homebuyer’s Report after you have tried to conceal them, any trust a buyer has invested in you will disappear.

If a potential buyer is aware of an issue before a sale, however, it is a lot easier for you to negotiate the cost of repair into the asking price itself. In situations such as these, honesty is king.

Of course, you can fix serious defects yourself prior to selling, but it is worth remembering that the amount you spend on the repairs may end up costing you more than the return you gain after a sale – so temper your hopes and expectations.

Selling a house that needs repairs done

Selling a house that needs repairs is all about knowing your target buyers, the majority will fall into the following categories:

  • Flippers – who aim to buy low, renovate and sell high.
  • Developers – who make their living by flipping, but on a larger scale.
  • Landlords – who aim to restore the property for rental purposes.
  • Bargain hunters – who hope to find themselves in a great district for schools, or simply wish to move into a well-respected neighbourhood but have so far been unable to afford a house in A1 condition.

All of these potential purchasers will be aware that the home will need some renovation, but their urge to buy – especially in the case of bargain hunters – will allow them to see past many of the flaws your house exhibits.

It is worth, however, being a little savvy if dealing with flippers, developers and landlords as these individuals are professionals, and will go out of their way to secure a price that maximises their profit, not yours. This can be remedied by having a valuation carried by an impartial third-party surveyor complete with an estimate of value once all repairs have been carried out. This ensures that you know where you stand with regard to the value of your home, and gives you further ammunition when dealing with particularly ‘hostile’ buyers.

Need to sell but no time to renovate? Why not ask National Homebuyers for advice, as we buy any house. Call 08000 443 911 or request a call back to find out how much you could get for your property.

Why can’t I sell my house?

If you find yourself in the unenviable position of being unable to sell your home, fear not – as there are always steps you can take to maximise your chances of a successful sale.

Selling a house is often described by those who have been through the process as a complete and utter nightmare. However, many of these people do not view the actual ‘sale’ as the greatest source of stress – that special award goes to the strain of praying that the timing of your sale, the timing of your purchase, and completion of the relevant paperwork are all completed within a reasonable time frame.

For a surprisingly large number of vendors, a planned purchase often falls through as a result of a failure to sell their own house, with a prospective buyer letting them down at the last moment. If you’re in this position, you may be asking yourself “Why is my house not selling?” Luckily, in this blog we’ll be looking at some of the most commonly cited reasons.

Why won’t my house sell?

There are a wealth of motives for a buyer to pull out of a sale – however it is important to note that being able to address these issues is not always within your control.

Bad presentation

Have you ever looked, and we mean really looked at your house? Have you ever stood back and put yourself in the shoes of a prospective buyer who’s trying to work out how much your house is worth to them? It’s often easy, as a homeowner, to ignore the lack of varnish on the window frames, or the bad paintwork on the lower half of the front door – but as a buyer, these things stick out like a sore thumb. For many individuals who are in the market to buy, cluttered window sills, a front yard or garden that is overrun by weeds, or even uneven paving can severely limit the likelihood of a viewing becoming a purchase.

Overpricing

Many homeowners mistakenly believe that buying a house guarantees a higher return upon its sale. The market itself can fluctuate in strength depending on the political landscape, area re-development or even time of year, and consequently, many owners end up asking themselves “why won’t my house sell?” even though they have placed their home on the market at a price 20% higher than a comparable property nearby. Most owners should expect to be low-balled with initial offers, and so a slightly higher asking price can be acceptable – but outlandish figures are guaranteed to deter buyers.

Location

Those who have owned their homes for a long time may realise that local amenities and services that were once available nearby are no longer there. Alternatively, maybe the area within which the house is situated is no longer a great choice for locals due to a lack of nearby jobs. As mentioned earlier, the political landscape can transform the attractiveness of any given region in a relatively short length of time. As a result, the reasons that led to you originally buying the house may no longer be valid for potential buyers.

Anti-social behaviour and crime

Do you live in a deprived area where crime is on the rise? Have you, in the past, had to deal with difficult neighbours? While many buyers forget to check crime statistics, they will often check with their agent and other nearby residents regarding day-to-day experiences on your street and whether or not there are any reasons to avoid a purchase. And unfortunately, even the odd disgruntled neighbour will be enough to put them off.

So, what can I do if I’m struggling to sell my house?

Luckily, some of the aforementioned issues can be easily rectified with little effort. In terms of presentation, a pot of paint and varnish from the local DIY store are a great investment to really make your home stand out from the crowd. You could also invest in a new front door to gain a buyer’s attention, as well as use weed killer on your garden or yard. Many sellers even hire power-washers to remove the build up of carbon that often leaves the outer walls of their homes looking shabby and undesirable. In short, a little effort goes a long way to encourage a sale.

If you do need to sell your house fast, it may be worth taking a small hit financially to ensure a sale in reasonable time. You can, of course, leave your home on the market for months, but the longer it stays on the market the more questions prospective buyers will have – and in all likelihood, an agent will advise you to lower your asking price after a certain length of time regardless. Getting the asking price right is an important part of encouraging a quick sale, so consider employing a surveyor to carry out a quick valuation of the property.

Unfortunately, when it comes to location or crime, there is little that you, as a seller, can do to increase the likelihood of a sale. If there are nearby amenities or services that are not immediately obvious to those who are not local, it can be worth writing a pamphlet containing any relevant information for anyone who comes for a viewing. Even better, realise that many prospective buyers will have different priorities to you, and that your worries about the distance to local services may not be an issue to them.

If you are aware of an increasing level of crime in your area, you can always appeal to your local council to have a greater police presence in an effort to reduce the frequency of offences nearby. You can also apply to the council to have graffiti removed, as well as damage to public property such as pavements and road signs fixed. Many residents in undesirable areas even form Neighbourhood Watch schemes – investing in CCTV cameras and community spirit to keep wrongdoers away.

Of course, sometimes you can be left screaming “Why is my house not selling?!” after months of exasperation due to viewings that never lead to an offer. But this doesn’t mean that you can’t sell. Luckily, there are property buying companies such as National Homebuyers who will buy your home for cash regardless of location or situation – and with most sales completed from start to finish in as little as seven days, you can savour the chance to finally move on with your life.

Can’t sell your home? Why not ask National Homebuyers for advice, as we buy any house. Call 08000 443 911 or 

request a call back

 to find out how much you could get for your property.