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"We’ve recently had our 2nd child and so decided that we needed to upsize both house and garden to accommodate our growing family. Having come across National Homebuyers website and reading the positive testimonials and reviews; we decided to make and enquiry and see if it was a service that would assist us. From the […]"

Mr G, Great Sankey

"I had been caring for my Mother for a number of years and the thought of selling my property using an Estate Agent was a hassle that I did not feel able to cope with."

Mrs J, Lydney, Gloucestershire

A world where people put more thought into a holiday than a home

A recent poll has suggested that most people put more thought into buying holidays, clothing and planning dinner parties than they do purchasing a house – but that’s not as insane as it sounds.

property-marketWhen you see your perfect home, it’s easy to make a snap judgement because, well, it just ‘feels right’. The house buying process is a strange one, often being dragged out over several months as conveyancers, estate agents and solicitors spend hours trying to contact one another and failing miserably. In fact, the decision to ‘buy’ is often the fastest part of the whole process, despite it being the largest purchase many will ever make… but should we really be spending more time deciding where to go on holiday than deciding where to call home? A poll of 2000 homebuyers carried out by HSBC this month has shed light on how long it takes a person to make various decisions in their lives, and the results are rather surprising.

According to the research, the average UK homebuyer will take around 26 hours to make a decision regarding a house purchase; yet will spend four times as long mulling over their prospective holiday destination. Even more startling is the fact that people spend 31 hours deciding what to serve guests at a dinner party – five hours longer than they spend picking out a property, while some women will spend up to 35 hours simply choosing a new pair of shoes.

The truth behind these figures, however, is not as ridiculous as it initially seems. For UK house buying experts, purchasing a new home can be likened to a game of poker – holding their cards close to their chest while looking for the cheapest deal, without being beaten to the punch by the competition. Sometimes they have to push themselves to seal the deal in order to secure the home of their dreams – and it’s important to remember that choosing a home is often a subjective rather than objective decision, as after all, you have to love where you live.

But when choosing a holiday destination, there is no time limit after which your dream holiday disappears. By and large, most countries tend to stay where they are without mysteriously vanishing – and this in turn allows for a more relaxed approach to the purchase. A holiday is also a more objective decision, with individuals having to account for facilities, entertainment and proximity from the beach and so forth. In addition, dropping £2000 on a holiday which turns out to be a total catastrophe can hurt a lot more emotionally than disliking your new home, which of course you can always sell on.

The greatest issue for those selling, however, is that much of the effort that is placed into selling the home can all be for nothing if nobody ‘falls in love’ with it during viewings. With factors such as surroundings, character and charm being high on the list of subjective reasons to purchase, a failure to present those can reduce the chances of a profitable sale. For those who do have issues selling their house, they can always use property buying companies, who buy any home for cash no matter its condition or location, leading to a fast property sale with honest trustworthy companies.

Worried your home isn’t appealing to buyers? Why not ask National Homebuyers for advice, as we buy any house. Call 08000 443 911 or request a call back to find out how much you could get for your property.

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